The last day of February

Where did the time go? Well, some of it went to walking in the woods.

winter alders
Light and shadow and it’s still wintery enough for the light to be all golden.

Continue reading “The last day of February”

More fungus

From today’s walk.

Probably spindle-shaped yellow coral
Some kind of yellow coral fungus.
orange mushrooms
Orange mushrooms from the side…
underside of orange mushroom
…and upside down.
underside of small shelf fungus
A turkey-tail type fungus from underneath…
top of small shelf fungus
…and above.
brown mushroom
And finally, your basic boring brown mushroom, but with some elegant frills.

mushroom closeup

Have some mushrooms.

mushroom
We had some enormous ones this year; these photos are all of the same kind. This was an early stage before it started to flatten out.
mushroom closeup
Fluffy!
mushroom closeup
And a bit dewy.
mushroom closeup
And a bit friendly.

Oddities

Well, not all of them are odd, but certainly there were some on a recent walk.

split tree trunk

This was the first one. Why had someone chiseled 3 holes into this tree trunk? It was done by humans, not animals; I know pileated woodpeckers peck rectangular holes, but they aren’t quite as rectangular and smooth-sided as this. And it looked like it was a few years old, and dug in rather than being a simple blaze.

But here’s the other thing—the tree originally caught my eye because it was so obviously 2 trees nestled together; the trunks stood out because they were differently coloured.

top of treetrunk that's not split

Except they weren’t. Higher up, they were clearly joined, and in fact the split doesn’t go through to the other side of the tree.

old burned out stump

This burned out stump wasn’t an oddity, particularly, but the hole was like an eye to the rest of the forest.

tree stump hanging in air

Another oddity. When trees fall over I’m not used to seeing the end with the roots suspended fifteen feet up. (It had fallen into the space between two other trees and jammed fairly high off the ground, and the weight of the crown had pulled the root ball into the air.)

mushrooms on treetrunk

And this isn’t an oddity at all, just some nice fungus.

details of underside of mushrooms

And a detail, because I can.

Winter light

The light of a winter sun is one of my favourite things. So have some beauty to share.

old wood and fern
Old wood and bracken
dew on salal leaf
Dew on a salal leaf
fungus on tree trunk
Fungus on a tree trunk
shadow on tree trunk
Shadow on tree trunk

Bird’s nest fungus

close up of birds nest fungus

The wee, wee eggs!

Actually, they’re fruiting bodies. It’s from the Nidulariaceae family, if you’re into the Latin. Wikipedia says, The nests are “splash-cups”. When a raindrop hits one at the right angle, the walls are shaped such that the eggs are expelled to about 1 m away from the cup in some species. 

This is growing on our back gate. I’m not sure it’s a good sign for the overall health of our gate.

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